REAL WEDDING

KERI + MICHAEL

LOVE STORY
“We are one of those cliché couples that when you know, you know,” Keri Troman says. Her first date with Michael Burnell was made up of beers at the Torquay Hotel two years ago. Keri, originally from Melbourne, fell in love quickly. “We started dating on weekends, and when that wasn’t enough we’d add a mid-week catch-up in, and soon enough I made the move down to Geelong and we moved in together,” she says. Keri wore her grandmother’s wedding dress, a 1930s stunning gown, with minor alterations to make it her own. At their nuptials, picture frames with song lyrics and quotes were used as decorations, a true personal touch that reflected their once long distance relationship. “We started doing ‘Tune Tuesday’ where we would send each other a song on Tuesdays and ‘Quote Fridays’ we’d send each other a quote,” Keri explains. “Be your natural self,” she advises.
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COVETING AFFORDABLE BRIDAL STYLE

Above: Crepe off shoulder wedding column dress, $300

Your wedding gown is definitely up there with one of the most important elements of the day. Many women are looking for that ‘wow’ moment, the moment where they feel like a bride. But you don’t have to spend thousands of dollars to have your moment. Online retailer ASOS has released its SS19 Bridal Edition – and it is a beauty. Think clean, contemporary cuts that are super stylish and super wearable. The collection includes fresh tailoring in the form of jumpsuits and blazer dresses – which have taken inspiration from city brides. While all-over sequins, beaded embellishments in icy tones and lace embroidered gowns offer a contrast to the more minimalist styles. The range also plays with proportions and details such as cape trains and kimono-style sleeves. Prices start at just $190, with the most expensive gown at $330. These stunning gowns are a bargain for your big day, or even as a second dress.

Above: Lace halter neck maxi wedding dress, $240

Above: Plunge cami wide leg wedding jumpsuit in satin, $240

Above: Ruched halter neck maxi wedding dress, $240

Above: Plaited wedding dress, $300

Above: Fringe maxi wedding dress, $330

Head to asos.com to shop.

REAL WEDDING

EMILY + ANTHONY

LOVE STORY
Emily Prince and Anthony Wilson were married on a sunny afternoon in September, overlooking Corio Bay. Emily had her six sisters by her side as her bridesmaids, and the family arrived in their father’s 1983 red Toyota Tarago van. “It was a family heirloom and was well known as the Prince Mobile,” Emily laughs. The bride knew as soon as she saw the strapless dress with the sweetheart cut on the rack that it was the one. She walked down the aisle in the lace number to a rendition of Beyoncé’s Crazy In Love. “It was the best day of our lives and we look back on it with everyone involved and couldn’t be happier.”



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REAL WEDDING

JACQUI + NATHAN

LOVE STORY
Nathan Thomas proposed to his love Jacqui Geary, in a shed on his parent’s property. The pair worked tirelessly to create their dream wedding celebration on the same property, making seating, the bar, decorations, every touch unique to them, making the moment all the more special when they read their handwritten vows to one another. “Whatever we didn’t have, we made,” Jacqui says. “There were personal touches everywhere.” The pair were wed on their six year anniversary. The rain held off for just long enough, with the pair only showered in rose petals, a happy moment. “It was a fun and emotional day that went so fast,” Nathan reflects. “We definitely made memories to last a lifetime.”

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PLATTER PERFECTION

IT BRINGS MAJOR WOW FACTOR TO ANY GATHERING OR CELEBRATION AND, WITH SOME EXPERT HELP FROM PLATTER CO, WE TAKE YOU THROUGH THE STEPS TO CREATING A
SHOW-STOPPING SELECTION OF FRUIT, CHEESE AND SAVOURY DELIGHTS

TOOLS:
Bread board, bread knife, 2 spoons

MATERIALS:
Large cheese board
3 cheese knives
2 dip/pâté knives
1 dip bowl
1 even smaller bowl for quince paste

PLATTER INGREDIENTS:
3 cheeses (hard, soft and blue), prosciutto, 1 x dip, 2 cracker varieties, quince or fig paste, fresh breads (think baguettes, olive bread or even a little fruit bread for my favourite combination), fresh fruits (think grapes, strawberries, figs and blueberries), selection of nuts and dried fruit, fresh sprigs of garden herbs for garnish

PROCEDURE:
1. Place your main items, cheeses, dips and quince paste on the board to start your framework.
2. Now you can start to build around them with your next biggest items. Placing your small bunches of grapes against each cheese, as well as your cracker and bread selections.
3. As you place the prosciutto, twist and pile it up to create another texture within your board.
4. See all the little holes between the bigger items? Start to trickle and fill those holes with cashews, walnuts, dried apricots, dried or fresh figs and maybe a few pretzels.
5. Finally, place a few fresh strawberries around your platter, and garnish with a little homegrown freshness from the garden, such as a few sprigs of rosemary

EXPERT TIPS:
You eat with your eyes, so if it’s looking fresh, colourful and abundant, it’s a guaranteed winner.
Everybody has a buddy. When you’re arranging the board, think about like you’re making a suggestion for what pairs well. Fruit bread next to a soft or blue cheese, olive bread next to the dip, sliced fig or pear with a blue cheese.
I’m also a big believer in balance over symmetry. Keep the colour and ingredients balanced on your board, but it doesn’t need to match.
In warmer weather, lean towards the harder cheeses, and swap out the cured meats for in-season fresh fruits.

CHOOSING YOUR PLATTER INGREDIENTS
Choosing platter ingredients is fun. Head to your local deli and just get curious. Some of my suggestions around Geelong with the best cheese ranges are Harveys of Highton, The Fresh Food Merchant, Geelong Fresh Foods, and East Fruit Market.

CATERING CORRECTLY
If you’re looking to feed a group for a meal with your platter, you should be planning for 500-700g of food per person. But if you’re like me and would prefer for there to be more than enough food, go with 600-800g per person. If it’s just a graze before or after dinner, wind that back to 200-300g per person.

I love wine … I love cheese. A gathering with both, is my favourite.
Here’s a few suggested wine pairings:
Pinot noir and brie
Sauvignon blanc and goat cheese
An aged port and blue cheese
Prosecco and something sharper and bitier like a parmesan

Photography: Hails & Shine

TAKING ON TRADITION

There are so many wedding traditions those before us would have adhered to as if it were law.  Weddings have never been more personal. However, some traditions are so lovely we might just  keep them around. Here are a few popular ones – we’ll let you decide which ones to take on

Smitten Wedding Photography

What you wear
Queen Victoria wore white on her wedding day in 1840, sparking the trend in the western world; before then, women just wore their best dress. Engagement and wedding rings are worn on the fourth finger of the left hand because it was once thought that a vein in that finger led directly to the heart. Diamonds only became popular as a choice for an engagement ring after an advertising campaign in the 1900s. So many of the traditions linked to your outfit actually don’t have much meaning at all – so wear something that you love.
Matching bridesmaids’ dresses
In ancient Rome, everyone in the bridal party, bride included, wore matching outfits, to confuse other suitors or evil spirits trying to get to the bride – essentially your bride tribe were your decoys. These days it is not uncommon for bridesmaids to wear alternating, or completely different attire. And when every woman, and man, is a different size and shape, it makes a lot of sense to mix things up.

Darcy Tuppen Photography

The first look
Back when arranged marriages were the norm, the engaged couple wasn’t allowed to see each other before the wedding at all. The event symbolised a business deal between two families, and the father of the bride feared that if the groom met the bride before the wedding and didn’t think she was attractive, he would call off the nuptials. Now it’s more of a superstition, a bad omen. If you’re not one to believe in superstitions or outdated practices, you might want to meet up with your partner before the vows, enjoying the moment in solitude and getting a few happy snaps.
Being given away
Being walked down the aisle and ‘given away’ to your groom by your father is a nod to the days where women were seen as property. Fast forward a few hundred or so years and this tradition is so much looser. Want to be given away by your dad? Great. Want to be given away by your mum? Also fine. Want to be given away by both? Why not! Or maybe it’s your grandparents, your brother, your bestie, or maybe you want to just walk down the aisle by yourself. Make your entrance whatever you want it to be.

Miranda Kremers Photography

Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue
This Victorian rhyme is a tradition supposed to bring the bride good luck. Something old alludes to retaining connection with family once entering married life. Something new represents the new union. Something borrowed is an opportunity for friends or family to lend something special as a token of love. Something blue represents fidelity and constancy. If you are going the extra mile, you can carry a sixpence in your shoe, to bring a life filled with good fortune. And, let’s be honest, who doesn’t want that?
Financials
The tradition of the bride’s family paying for the big day stems back to concept of a dowry – a sum paid to the groom for becoming the provider for the bride. Now that women can provide for themselves, it’s more of a flexible gesture. Spend and accept money only when comfortable.

Elk and Willow Photography

REAL WEDDING

JESSICA + SAMUEL

LOVE STORY
Jessica Smith put her late grandmother’s wedding ring and her late great-grandmother’s wedding ring on her right hand on her wedding day, something special to honour family who could not be there. Samuel Dangerfield waited a top of a hang gliding launch pad at Moggs Creek, when Jess was led down the aisle by her parents to say “I do” with the sweeping views of Aireys Inlet and Lorne on show. “It is somewhere Sam and his family really treasure so it was very special having it up there, even with a bit of wind,” Jess says. “It was amazing to see the guests’ reactions to the ceremony location, it was so special.” The reception, at a Surf Coast venue, was a continuation of a joyous day and night. “For the both of us, watching everyone else have so much fun and being so happy for us was so special – it was such a happy and fun wedding,” Jess says.
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REAL WEDDING

SALLY + SEAN

LOVE STORY
Sally Mayberry and Sean Wride met while at university and have been inseparable ever since. “I love way she walks, talks and just is,” says Sean. “Sean tells me he loves me and that I am beautiful every day, and I mean every day for the last 11 years – that’s something very special,” Sally adds. Sean proposed on Lake Ashi in Japan, with Mount Fuji as the backdrop. “Sean had planned this moment for the better part of six months to make sure everything was perfect,” Sally says. “It was unbelievable and I hold Japan close to my heart.” The pair opted to take their closest family and friends on a magical trip to lush forest in the Dandenong Ranges for their nuptials. “It felt special to be able to take our guests to somewhere so beautiful and then spend the entire weekend with everyone,” Sally remembers with happiness. “The day was just perfect.”
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REAL WEDDING

HARRIET + ANDREW

LOVE STORY
“Easily the first look,” is Harriet Fist’s instant reaction when asked what her favourite memory of her wedding day. She first laid eyes on Andrew Rhodes when assigned a seat next to him in year 8. “A friendship began and a deep connection which has grown and evolved ever since,” she says. “I love Andy’s sense of humour and his patience – never before have I met such a humble and patient soul.” Harriet named her groom’s late sister as her bridesmaid, and honoured her further by releasing a balloon at the end of their ceremony in her memory. “It was a beautiful moment to share and a special way to acknowledge and include our sister in our day,” Harriet says. “The photos from that moment will be cherished forever.”


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REAL WEDDING

LAURA + CAMERON

DATE TO REMEMBER
When Cameron Alford and Laura Schram first kissed as husband and wife they could not help but beam with joy. The couple has been through a life-changing couple of years, with Laura diagnosed with cancer during her third pregnancy in 2016. Children Jasper, Ivy and Alfie held the wedding rings in their hands for a few moments and handed them to their parents to exchange. “We wanted everyone special in our lives there to celebrate and who more special than our three babies,” says Laura. “The second I saw Laura all I could think was how lucky we both were to be here,” Cam says. “It was the happiest I’ve been and the best day to top off such a stressful few years. She looked so beautiful and just beamed light.”For more imagery, including a full list of suppliers, CLICK HERE.