BLOSSOMING ROMANCE

Flowers are no longer restricted to bridal bouquets. Florists and couples are coming up with creative floral concepts to make a special day bloom beautifully, as Jenna Meade discovers

Photography: Foto Jojo

Photography: Foto Jojo

Fabulous florals are taking centre stage this wedding season.
Now more than ever, blooms are breaking out of their traditional bouquet moulds and making a statement throughout special days.
From intricate installations to blossoming highlights within the finer details, couples are working with their florists to get creative with their flower styling.
Newtown’s Judy Chirnside, who has been a florist for more than 30 years, says this year is seeing the emergence of flowers as a crucial styling aspect of weddings.
“There has been a constant parade of creativity, including hanging installations, flower walls and archways,” Judy says.

Photography: Ashley K Wedding Photography

Photography: Ashley K Wedding Photography

Photography: Foto Jojo

Photography: Foto Jojo

Photography: Hails and Shine

Photography: Hails and Shine

“These can showcase many flowers, and take hours of designing and arranging, but we are really enjoying the challenge and adore the end result of these stylish innovations.”
These innovations are in abundance from ceremony to reception. Cascading floral installations are a talking point while guests dance the night away underneath, cakes are no longer simply iced – they’re adorned with bold blooms – and the bride herself is
incorporating more florals into her bridal attire, with the sweet flower crown no longer restricted to flowergirls.
In a move away from tightly-bound bouquets, florals are being arranged in a more relaxed way to create a natural, bohemian look.
“It’s that ‘just picked from the garden’ look which is a beautiful way of arranging flowers because it provides a space for each flower and we can see the beauty of each bloom,” she says, adding that current popular colour combinations are ranging from deep reds and pale pinks to madly clashing pops of bright hues.
“Then it is fun to add twigs, berries and other ‘sticky out’ bits and pieces to add more texture and dimension. Winter brings with it a whole new colour and flower palette.”
Be it the sunny season or the chilly winter months, every season offers its own special
varieties of blooms.

Photography: Karina Jade Photography

Photography: Karina Jade Photography

Photography: Alan Moyle Wedding Photography

Photography: Alan Moyle Wedding Photography

Photography: Karina Jade Photography

Photography: Karina Jade Photography

Winter and early spring are prime times for blossoms, hellebores, hyacinths, tulips, rhododendrons, sweet peas, ranunculus and anemones.
Meanwhile, the peony teases us with a short season in November and December.
Roses and David Austins are always a huge drawcard for summer and autumn weddings.
“The variety of texture, size and colour of the David Austin is so extensive, and they mix so well with many flowers or stand-alone beautifully,” she says.
But while new creations and combinations are breaking through, Judy says the humble classics are quietly making a comeback.
“We would only need to look at great, or even great-great grandmother’s wedding bouquets to show us proof that anything old is now brand spanking new and contemporary,” she says.
“For instance, this season, the dahlia – in every shape and colour – has been hands down the favourite for any occasion.
“I see every trolley at the market brimming over with dahlias, and I imagine this love affair will endure as new species peep around every corner.”
Other old favourites to consider for your line-up are chrysanthemums, hydrangeas, eucalypt foliage and gypsophilas.
“Gypsophila was so overused in the 90s that it became totally taboo – every little hole was filled with the little fluffy white head,” Judy says.
“But now it’s back with a vengeance and I think best used en masse.”
Judy offers some wise words for brides to- be who are yet to choose their florist or their wedding flowers for their big day.
“Experience really counts when choosing a florist to work with, especially when the end result needs to be spectacular,” she says.
“It also helps for the florist to be aware of the bride’s budget – this is of benefit to both parties as they can then achieve the best result for her vision together.”

Photography: Enchanted Wedding Photography

Photography: Enchanted Wedding Photography

Photography: Stefani Driscoll Photography

Photography: Stefani Driscoll Photography